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Finished Leather Types

Full Grain/Full Top Grain Leahter
In order to be considered full grain leather it cannot have been buffed or sanded on the top. So, when the full natural grain is retained throughout the tanning process it is called Full Grain Leahter.

Corrected Grain Leahter
Leather that has had an artificial grain embossed onto it after the range marks have been buffed out.

Nappa Leahter
Originally, only sheepskin was referred to as Nappa. However, in recent years, the word Nappa has become another leahter term meaning soft, as in Nappa cowhide. A Nappa leather, or sheep/lamb skin, is naturally one of the softest leathers in the market today. If it looks good and feels good, it probably is, but it’s not always a better or more expensive grade of leahter like true Nappa is.

Patched Leather
After the hides are tanned, dyed and finished as desired, then silled craftsmen carefully select leahter that match in volor and texture. Each leather hide is then cut by hand into various size pieces and then it is sewn into mosaic type patterns making a final product that is one of a kind.

 Patent Leather
When cowhide is treated with protective finishes such as acrylic paints or waterproofing to produce an extremely shiny finish.

Nubuck Leather
A full aniline leather that has been sanded or buffed in order to create a nap. This is top grain leather and is not considered a split or suede. Nubuck Aniline leathers on which the surface has been brushed to create a texture similar to that of velvet. It is often mistaken for suede, but suede is the flesh dide of a piece of leather while Nubuck is an effect that is done to the grain side, making it considerably stronger.

Suede Leather
When leather is finished by buffing with an emory whell to produce a napped surface. Suede is made from layers split off from the top grain protion fo the hide.

Pull up Leahter
It produces a burst of color when the leather is pulled tight. This leather uses a full aniline dye and in addition has an oil and/or wax application, which separates causing the color to become lighter as the leather is pulled.